Getting started with coded development in Microsoft Dynamics 365

So you want to write some code do you?

This is a series of articles in which I will explore coded development and Microsoft Dynamics 365. I intend to produce a set of articles that will touch on key areas of coded development, with a focus on C# .Net development.

It’s worth mentioning the recent change from CRM to 365. Whilst this introduced a number of wide ranging changes to CRM, the core CRM platform has remained fundamentally the same. In this series I’m focussing on the core features relating to what was CRM, these are the features that most people will use and need. It’s worth remembering there is more out there, and that you will see differences in older versions of Dynamics.

I expect the average reader to have some knowledge of coded development in general, some experience with CRM customisation and configuration, but limited experience with CRM development. For what’s it worth I’ll be using Visual Studio 2017. I’ll be posting the code on GitHub.

Time for the reading material, the Dynamics CRM Developer Centre. The MSDN is great resource, I’ve found I can answer the majority of my questions by simply Googling “MSDN CRM [the thing I desperately need to know about]”. Most pages have a version selector so watch out for that. It won’t solve every problem, but when in doubt consult the MSDN first.

I’ve attempted to split the articles into reasonable chunks that largely can be read in or out of order.

If you have thoughts or feedback, it would be very much appreciated.

Contents:

  1. Writing client side code with Microsoft Dynamics 365
  2. Writing server side code with Microsoft Dynamics 365
  3. Microsoft Dynamics 365 and the importance of staying supported
  4. Introducing the Microsoft Dynamics 365 web services
  5. Exploring the Microsoft Dynamics 365 SDK
  6. Connecting to Microsoft Dynamics 365 using the SDK
  7. Using the 365 entity class in a late bound fashion
  8. Create, retrieve, update, & delete 365 data in a late bound fashion
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8 thoughts on “Getting started with coded development in Microsoft Dynamics 365

  1. Pingback: Writing client side code with Microsoft Dynamics 365 | WOODSWORKBLOG

  2. Pingback: Writing server side code with Microsoft Dynamics 365 | WOODSWORKBLOG

  3. Pingback: Microsoft Dynamics 365 and the importance of staying supported | WOODSWORKBLOG

  4. Pingback: Introducing the Microsoft Dynamics 365 web services | WOODSWORKBLOG

  5. Pingback: Exploring the Microsoft Dynamics 365 SDK | WOODSWORKBLOG

  6. Pingback: Connecting to Microsoft Dynamics 365 using the SDK | WOODSWORKBLOG

  7. Pingback: Using the 365 entity class in a late bound fashion | WOODSWORKBLOG

  8. Pingback: Create, retrieve, update, & delete 365 data in a late bound fashion | WOODSWORKBLOG

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